Olives

The olive, known by the botanical name Olea Europaea, meaning “European olive”, is a species of small tree in the family Oleaceae, found in the Mediterranean Basin from Portugal to the Levant, the Arabian Peninsula, and southern Asia as far east as China, as well as the Canary Islands and Réunion. The species is cultivated in many places and considered naturalized in all the countries of the Mediterranean coast, as well as in Argentina, Saudi Arabia, Java, Norfolk Island, California, and Bermuda. The olive’s fruit, also called the olive, is of major agricultural importance in the Mediterranean region as the source of olive oil; it is one of the core ingredients in Mediterranean cuisine.

Description

  • Kalamata

Kalamata olive is a large, dark purple olive with a smooth, meaty texture named after the city of Kalamata in the southern Peloponnese, Greece. Often used as table olives, they are usually preserved in wine vinegar or olive oil.

  • Green Olive

Green olives are obtained from olives harvested during the ripening cycle when they have reached normal size, but prior to colour change. They are usually handpicked when there is a slight change in hue from leaf-green to a slightly yellowish green and when the flesh begins to change consistency but before it turns soft.

  • Black olives

Black Olives or ripe olives are picked at full maturity when fully ripe. They are found in assorted shades of purple to brown to black. Most black olives are, in fact, not ripe olives, but are green olives that have been chemically treated to blacken them.